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Lockjaw 2013


An Interview with Medavon DeRaj'e of Lockjaw
by Chris Fox
December 2013

The southern Wisconsin music scene breeds a lot of unique music, but when it comes to hard rock and metal, we have a vivid array of diverse musicians. LOCKJAW, out of Milwaukee, brings an industrial approach, which is often lost on the smaller scene, to bluesy metal.

With influences ranging from Fleetwood Mac and Elton John to NIN and Type O Negative and several years on the local scene, Medavon DeRaj’e (vocals and guitar) brands their music as “Hell Rock,” which explains their attraction to darker tones and intense dynamics. He explains, “[I have always] loved how early industrial bands combined synths and electronics in their music. I’m a huge fan of old school metal, thrash, and 80’s stuff. I find it very hard to digest most of the newer metal bands these days. If I can’t understand the lyrics, then I usually can’t relate. I love heavy but it also needs a groove.”


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Madison's Lords of Discipline

Lords Of Discipline

by Chris Fox
August 2009

Take the shredding of Yngwie Malmsteen and Joe Satriani combined with the epic musings of bands like Nile and Behemoth and top it all of with beer soaked Wisconsin metal you have LORDS OF DISCIPLINE, a quintet that define their own take on metal. As bassist Nick Moreno explains, “we only have one gear, and that’s straight out metal, that’s it… we just play metal.”

Brutal and technical are the words these guys live by. Their name runs deeps through not only their musical ventures, but the LORDS OF DISCIPLINE are also regimented in their downtime. Whether it’s learning various forms of martial arts or constant guitar theory, discipline is the heart and soul seeking the level of mastery with a martial arts state-of-mind in music. Their recording techniques reflect the structure they require to create such a monsterous sound. Moreno explains, “it’s the most intimidating thing I have ever come across as a musician.”


Madison's Lords of the Trident on cover of April 2010

Lords Of The Trident

by Chris Fox
April 2010

Can you define heavy metal? Does metal mean screaming vocals and deadly distortion? Or is metal wailing guitar solos and an iron lunged singer?

To Fang VonKillenstein of Lords Of The Trident, heavy metal is “that distorted sound that makes you roll down your windows in the summer and makes you put your fist in the air, out the window. It just gives you that feeling in the pit of your stomach that just drives that ‘yeah.’” One can only assume that “yeah” would make King Diamond proud.

Mr. Killenstein, also known as Ty, defines their sound as “80’s metal mixed with modern influences.”

“Our structure is more towards classics 80’s, but we down tune and are fans of modern death and black metal. Those tonalities show up a lot as well.”

Using their local flavor, they have turned bits and pieces of the UW Campus and Madison into epic metal. Fang explains:

“The Madison music scene is really a lot of indie rock, around campus especially. When you say metal, the average Joe thinks of death and turns the other cheek to our music. Half the people come to our shows for cool music, but the other half just come to see what the hell we are up to. “


Lords of the Trident: The most METAL band on earth! - photo by Mary Sweeney Photography

Lords of the Trident

an interview with vocalist Fang Von Wrathenstein
by Teri Barr
October 2016

My assignment? A pre-Halloween show Q & A with Ty Christian, better known as Fang VonWrathenstein, lead singer of the Madison-based band Lords of the Trident.

What I learned? The band has been in Max Ink twice before, and has only had to endure two line-up changes.

But, the goal has never changed:  world domination.
Too serious?

Consider, it is October, and this is not a group taking itself too seriously.
Still, this band is no joke. Made up of talented musicians, Lords of the Trident has also been signed to a label in Europe, and is creating a monthly column for Guitar World Magazine called, “Music of the Arcane.”

It’s just a few of the steps on the way to world domination.
Hope you enjoy reading about the rest.

Maximum Ink:  You were a young barbarian when your parents urged you to learn the war cries of your people. Was this your first foray into music?
Fang Von Wrathenstein:
We also trained on various instruments - the bone xylophone, the skull trumpet. My mother even had an accordion made from flexible bison hide that she would play from time to time. But they always knew my true passion was in the vocalizations of our various war calls. That’s how I began to train my voice in the power of true META. Later, when the time came to record our first album, I started to get into the production-side of music, learning all I could about the various microphone techniques and equalization strategies. Thankfully, a number of strong mortal warriors helped, otherwise our albums would’ve sounded much worse than they do.


Lords of the Trident on the Cover of Maximum Ink in Oct. 2013

Lords of the Trident 2013

An interview with Fang VonWrathenstein
by Chris Fox
October 2013

The LORDS OF THE TRIDENT have been bludgeoning the music scene for the last five years, and after a successful Kickstarter campaign to fund their new EP, Plan of Attack, they are hitting Madison venues. On October 19, they are playing The Inferno with Circleswitch, Sparklefuck, and Warnerbeast. Maximum Ink had the opportunity to catch up with Fang VonWrathenstein, the vocalist for LORDS OF THE TRIDENT, since they are also playing the Maximum Ink Halloween Weekend at the Frequency on October 25. This year they are going as Judas Priest, and have said that concert goers could expect to be run over by a bunch of motorcycles.

Maximum Ink: How would you define the sound of LORDS OF THE TRIDENT?
Fang VonWrathenstein: Lords of the Trident is the most metal band on earth. Imagine, if you will, taking the thunderous sounds of a thousand steeds rampaging into battle, and combine it with the clashing produced by the swords and spears of men ready to kill or be killed. Then add some guitars. That’s pretty close to the incredibly face-melting, soul-stealing sound of the pure metal, produced by the Lords.
MI: Obviously, a huge part of your band’s repertoire is based on your live show. What inspired the band’s on-stage persona?


Lorenzon Music on the cover of Maximum Ink in March 1998 - photo by Rokker

Lorenzo Music

by Jeff Muendel
March 1998

Despite grumblings about the supposedly long lost Madison music scene, new and talented bands keep rising up as if nothing had ever burned or closed down. The better ones, like anywhere else, are those that seem to defy easy categorization. You hear a hint of this and a reference to that, but you can’t pin the group down. Such is the case with Lorenzo Music.

At the core are two musicians who have experienced the changing musical tides here between the lakes. Tod Schwenn spent a good amount of time in Rapscallion during the late-80s and early-90s, around the same time Tom Ray was in Fallacy. After those bands broke up, the two decided to start jamming and writing together. The songs came together so well that they decided to form a permanent band and, after finding the right musicians, did their first gig in March of 1996.

Lorenzo Music explores many areas of sound, going from keyboard- driven, Doors-like jams to lounge swings to power guitars in a single song. The key is that they do it gracefully, at times almost unnoticeably. Most of the keyboards are done on a vintage Rhodes electric piano that Ray bought for $150 when such instruments were out of style. Schwenn supplies the guitar and the two share the vocal work. Every musician in this band has experience: second guitarist Brandon Krueger was in Peep Show, bassist Mark Whitcomb played in Insanity A.D., Carl and Swiggo, and drummer Scott Beardsley also gigged with Swiggo as well as Mindox (which also featured Buddo of Magic 7 & Last Crack).


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Lost City Music Festival

Lost City Music Festival

Mine All Mine Record's Second Annual Festival of Regional Music
by John Noyd
July 2013

Returning for a second round highlighting the region’s incredible array of musical talent, the Lost City Music Festival presents twenty-eight acts over four days and three venues. Sponsored by Mine All Mine Records and hosted by Madison’s High Noon Saloon, Dragonfly Lounge and Bright Red Studios from August 8th to the 11th, the festival’s focus on the regional bands reaps an eclectic mix of musical styles. A bargain at $7 per show with an option of full-pass wristbands for only $12, LCMF sweetens the pot by donating a portion of the proceeds to the Madison Area Music Association, supporting MAMA’s commitment to local school music programs to insure there will be future generations of bands for years to come.


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