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Sunset Black


by Sarah Klosterbuer
January 2003

Brandon Sammons of Minneapolis band Sunset Black (MCA) interview

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Sunshine For The Blind Live

Sunshine For The Blind

An interview with Brian Daly
by Mike Huberty
January 2012

As the creative outlet for one-half of DNA Studios’ production masterminds, Brian Daly, SUNSHINE FOR THE BLIND, has been performing guitar rock with pop inflections in the Madison area for the better part of the last decade. Their latest album, Second Self, is an absolutely sonically masterful collection of straight-up classic alternative rock songs. There’s plenty of excellent guitar work, big chorus hooks, and a solid (and wonderfully complex) rhythm section provided by bassist Ken Stevenson and drummer Andrew Rohn.

As the guitarist and vocalist for SUNSHINE FOR THE BLIND as well as one of Madison’s most prolific audio engineers, Daly has been into music since he was a kid, “I have always experienced music that I like as transporting,” he says, “as an entry to another world. A world that generally seemed better than the normal world..  Part of this experience was a desire to create music myself. This isn’t logical; it’s possible to love music and not want to make it. But I was infected with this viral aspect of music.“

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Sunspot at the Market Square theater in Madison - photo by Mike App

Sunspot

An interview with the WI natives, Ben Jaeger, Mike Huberty, and Wendy Lynn Staats
by Tina Hall
February 2011

Wisconsin based Sunspot is made up of Ben Jaeger (Guitar & Vocals), Mike Huberty (Lead Vocals & Bass), and Wendy Lynn Staats(Drums & Vocals). The trio from Madison offer up singalong rock with a local flair. Their newest album Singularity was voted Madison’s Rock Album of the Year by the Madison Area Music Association, with the tracks, No Place Like Home being named Rock Song of the Year, and Sweet Relief, Video of the Year. They have opened for acts such as Death Cab for Cutie, The Flaming Lips, Sponge, SevenMaryThree, Hot Hot Heat, and Sick Puppies. Earlier this year they licensed the song “Go, Pack!” to FOX Sports for use during the NFC Playoffs and Super Bowl, events seen by tens of millions of people around the world.

Maximum Ink: Can you tell us a little about your background? How do you think coming from where you do has influenced your musical styling?
Ben Jaeger: We came from small towns surrounding a medium sized city -Milwaukee. We have spent a lot of time in big cities sharing our songs, but we very much enjoy returning to our roots. Madison has been our home for 15 years now and there are many things that we enjoy about it. It is small enough that people in the music community are accessible and supportive, but the city is large enough that there are plenty of people to interest in being fans. Our music is very real and honest and appeals to a variety of people from sci-fi geeks to jocks to musicians to avid readers.

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Madison's Sunspot

Sunspot

An Interview with the members of Sunspot
by Teri Barr
June 2014

It’s a large arena sound, from a small band with supersonic energy. A Sunspot show is tight, fast, and really fun; and while you can hear the difference in their many years of playing together as a group; you can also see it on stage.
Mike Huberty (lead singer, bass, keyboard) and Ben Jaeger (lead guitar, keyboard, singer) have gelled since junior high. Wendy Lynn Staats (drums, singer, violin) joined them in college, and the three have never looked back.

The past 14 years, in a brief discography list with much-deserved awards, look like this: Radio Free Earth (2000), Loser of the Year (2002, Madison Area Music Association Award-MAMAs Rock Album of the Year), Cynical (2005, WAMI Artist of the Year), Neanderthal (2007), Singularity (2009, MAMAs Rock Album of the Year, Video of the Year, Rock Song of the Year), Major Arcana (live rock opera national tour and DVD), The Slingshot Effect (2011, MAMAs Rock Album of the Year and Song of the Year), Arthuriana-EP (2013), Archaeopteryx-EP (2014), and now the Dangerous Times-EP, being released at a special show at The Dragonfly in July. Huberty is describing it this way by saying, “We go all out in our live show and we want people who’ve seen us dozens of times to get something new out of each experience. The Dragonfly show is going to be one of the most complex set pieces we’ve attempted. The songs link together, so it’s more of a musical than just a collection of songs performed live. We do our best to make sure that every aspect of every show has meaning. We won’t be pulling any punches for this party. We’re saying that “the fireworks are starting early for the 4th this year” and we mean it.”

And I know they do. I’ve interviewed the band before, I’ve seen their shows in all types of venues, and I’ve followed them through their many treks with technology, and to SXSW. The enthusiasm for what they do as a band, is contagious.
Read on for more from all the notes I’ve compiled and edited via past and present interviews and chats. You’ll understand how Sunspot could soon launch into the Stratosphere.

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Jim Wilbur of Superchunk

Superchunk

An Interview with Superchunk Guitarist Jim Wilbur
by John Noyd
January 2014

Formed in Chapel Hill, North Carolina in 1989, Superchunk has maintained the same line-up since 1991, releasing heartfelt high-velocity indie-rock over the course of eight albums before taking a hiatus in 2001. Returning from their various side-projects in 2010, the band currently finds itself promoting their tenth full-length, “I Hate Music,” without their original bassist Laura Ballance, whose hearing issues has made her participation in their volcanic live shows untenable. In anticipation of playing Madison’s 2014 FRZN Fest January 19th, Superchunk’s Jim Wilbur was kind enough to answer a few questions via email.

MAXIMUM INK: Superchunk’s guitar sound has been an influential force for years, what guitarists do you admire and are there any guitarists/bands playing today you find particularly interesting?

Jim Wilbur: Thanks for the compliment. Let me say first of all that I am a completely un-trained guitarist, never had a lesson. I bought my first guitar (a crappy off-brand acoustic) when I was a senior in high school after listening to the Minutemen’s “Double Nickels on the Dime”. I had a little pamphlet with some basic chord diagrams and that was that. I usually tell people I perform with a guitar - rather than say I play a guitar. So… basically I admire anyone who can ACTUALLY play the damn things, especially people who seem to play intuitively.

MI: After so many years together Superchunk seems more like a family than a band, how would you describe the group dynamics and what do you feel are your responsibilities in the band?

JW: You’re right. I think we are more like a family at this point, that, or maybe a gang. We all know how to deal with one another, where each other’s toes are and ways to avoid stepping on them. As far as my responsibilities go, hmmm… back in the 90’s I did most of the driving, but I don’t suppose that is what you mean. I think the most important thing for each of us is to be respectful of one another and allow each other the space to live inside the group. That may sound a little New Agey. When we are arranging/writing songs we all have to figure out how to complement one another and not step on each other’s parts. I’m talking musically here - but the same goes for the personal relationships we share with one another.

MI: The band seems happy to tour, I’ve always wondered, how does it get decided who gets to choose the music in the van?

JW: Back in the day the rule was “Driver picks the tape”. Since I drove about 90% of the time, that meant the band had to sit through my homemade mix-tapes of Def Leppard, Squeeze, The Verlaines and various hardcore punk bands. These days everyone is plugged into their own little worlds. Everyone but me, that is. I don’t really like listening to music in moving vehicles. Mostly I just sit there and ask questions of my band mates that go unanswered because they can’t hear me. Ha.

MI: Obviously there has to be a difference not having Laura touring with you on bass for this tour, what’s the band’s history with her stand-in Jason?

JW: We’ve know Jason for years. Jon has played with him in Bob Pollard’s band as well as Bob Mould’s trio. He’s a smashing fellow and a quick study. I’m reminded of our first practice with him. We ran through “Slack Motherfucker” and after the chorus we stopped because the bass sounded weird. Mac, Jon and I were sure he was playing the wrong notes. So we sent a quick email to Laura who was at her desk in the Merge office asking what she played at that point in the song. While waiting for a reply we listened to the song on YouTube and sure enough, Jason was right. I think we never heard the song properly since we usually play it at the end of a set when some of us might have had a little too much beer!


MI: The energy your guitar provides is enormous. Is there a warm-up routine you employ before a show or do you just plug and play?

JW: Mac and I just plug in and play.. Mac will do vocal warm-ups that sound like he’s making farting noises with his lips. Jon will warm up by playing paradiddles on sofa arms or chair-backs. If I’m sitting too close to him he’ll use my calves and feet

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Supersuckers on the cover of Maximum Ink in May 2002

Supersuckers


by Sarah Klosterbuer
May 2002

There are two types of country music. There’s the whiney, poppy, overproduced dribble, and then there’s the kind produced by the Supersuckers - the good kind.

To say the least, the Supersuckers are a bit bipolar when it comes to musical styles. They’ve opened for White Zombie and Motorhead and also backed country legend Willie Nelson. Producing primarily rock albums, the band also delivered a country disc in 1997, providing the material for their latest live release, “Must’ve Been Live.”

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Sweet Cyanide

Sweet Cyanide


by Alexandra Radel
July 2009

With songs titled “Suicide Love Machine,” “Certain Shadows on the Wall,” “Crash Theory,” and “Heartbreaker” these four New York rockers put a new spin on sex, drugs, and rock n roll. Sweet Cyanide is an electric collision of two respected New York bands, Crashbox and Moment Theory. The band consists of Sal Scoca and Angelo Fariello from Crashbox and Mike Bambrace and Joe Salvatore from Moment Theory. When the two bands were active Crashbox sold over 5,000 copies, and Moment Theory was recognized by Billboard’s independent songwriter’s contest.

Sweet Cyanide’s self-titled album drops July 7. Immediately following the release of their album they will be doing some regional touring through August. The first song on the album, “Crash Theory,” will also be the first single. Be listening for “Crash Theory” on the radio in early Sept. Currently, Sweet Cyanide is working out the kinks for opening slots in the fall with some big named bands.

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