Today is: Sunday October 21, 2018 | Status: Under Re-development | Version 2.99.03

Articles Alphabetically

Band name or last name first
Todd Wolfe at Tobacco Road

The Todd Wolfe Band

An interview with singer and guitarist Todd Wolfe
by Tina Hall
September 2010

Todd Wolfe currently has a radio show at http://wlvr.org Mondays 12 noon - 3 p.m. Todd is probably best known from his previous work with Sheryl Crow. While working with her he has shared the stage with artists like Emmylou Harris, Steve Winwood, James Taylor, Jackob Dylan, Eric Clapton, Elton John, Marty Stuart, and Sara McLaughlin.  Over the years he has opened for some of the biggest names in music including, Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, Bob Dylan,Peter Frampton, Johnny Winter, Allman Brothers, Buddy Guy, and Kenny Wayne Shepherd. He now works mainly with his solo project The Todd Wolfe band.

Maximum Ink: How is your radio show going? What can fans expect from that? Did you ever think you’d have your own show?
Todd Wolfe: I enjoy the radio show and it’s been going on for over ten years. When I first started, I did the “community” sessions meaning when school was out, but some years back I just stayed on through both schedules. I have taken a couple of “sessions” off as I was traveling with the band, but I’m still there. It’s very enjoyable playing music for other people and I guess I always kind of played as DJ growing up when friends would be hanging at my house, but never thought I’d have my own show! I did dream about if from time to time ‘cause after seeing “Play Misty For Me” an early Clint Eastwood flick, where he plays a jazz jock, I thought what a cool job that would be! As far as tuning in and what you would hear. Mostly roots rock but it can be anything from Howlin’ Wolf to Stone Temple Pilots, to John Coltrane to The Rolling Stones!

Read More...


Tom Fuller Band live at the Triple M studio in Madison - photo by John McCally

Tom Fuller Band


by John Noyd
July 2009

To see Tom Fuller today one would never guess that little over ten years ago he was a solid cog in corporate America and had never written a song all the way through. From the streaked mod haircut to the purple granny glasses and matching sneakers Tom Fuller emanates rock and roll. Tamed danger prowling, the glam-punk poise echoing the bigger than life sound of his band a tight group both young and experienced, sharp and dedicated.

Ironically, after talking with Tom for over a half an hour the conversation was less about music than destiny and life’s spiritual journey. Perhaps it’s due to the fact that while Tom is the leader and songwriter for the Tom Fuller Band he is entirely self-taught beyond a few guitar lessons when he was nine. In fact, Tom says he’s a “song-crafter more than a writer.” “I write what I feel; my lyrics are always emotion-based.” His gut instinct guides him and serendipity has brought him an entourage of good fortune. “I know in the first twenty seconds if I’m going to like a song.” Immediate, intuitive and insistent, Tom also knows personalities and opportunities and has learned how to play them both with rock and roll nonchalance.

Read More...


Tom Morello - The Nightwatchman (Rage Against The Machine, Audioslave)

Tom Morello - The Nightwatchman


by Mack Dreyfuss
November 2008

Music lovers attempting to use their money wisely during these dour economic times may have just found the show of the year to attend. Musico-political titan, Tom Morello, is coming to the Pabst Theater in Milwaukee on Nov. 12 under the moniker, The Nightwatchman. For those who don’t immediately recognize his name, you may be familiar with Rage Against the Machine or Audioslave, bands who have been built with Morello on lead guitar. Rolling Stone rates him 26 on the list of 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time. His most recent solo project released Sept. 30 is called “The Fabled City.” The Nightwatchman, Morello’s “folk singer alter ego,” transfuses politically charged lyrics into guitar riffs reminiscent of “eighties Dylan + Jimi Hendrix.”

The genesis of The Nightwatchman occurred while playing packed stadium shows with Audioslave. Morello hungered to voice his political views and be more intimate with his audience. Soon after, he released “One Man Revolution.” He states: “…it was absolutely the most fulfilling, artistically as anything I had ever done….There were a few nights where it really felt like in this tiny, dark coffeehouse that everybody’s soul in the room was at stake.”

Read More...


Tommy Emmanuel

An interview with guitarist Tommy Emmanuel
by Max Ink Writer List
March 2014

Tommy Emmanuel is an acoustic guitar virtuoso who has delighted fans with his complicated fingerstyle technique. He has been playing Maton guitars for most of his career. A long-standing fan of Chet Atkins, he recorded the album “The Day Finger Pickers Took Over The World” with Atkins. The album also turned out the be the last Atkins ever recorded. Tommy still performs at the Chet Atkins Appreciation Society every July in Nashville. He recently wrapped a tour alongside Martin Taylor.

Maximum Ink: What was it like being taught to accompany your mother on steel guitar when you were only 4? Do you think,looking back, those are some of your most fond memories? What do you think is the most important thing you learned from her?
Tommy Emmanuel: It was so long ago, it’s hard to remember everything. I recall it was exciting to play music with my mother – every day I looked forward to hearing the school bell, knowing that I would run across the road to our home and my mum would be waiting to play. She showed me some songs that were simple and easy to remember. She taught me how a song is constructed, to know the difference between the verse and the chorus and the bridge, and to look out for key changes. I think I learned the importance of melody against chords through learning all these songs.

MI: Do you remember what it was like to work as musician at the age of 6? Did you ever get stage fright when you first started playing to crowds?
TE: I was never afraid of going on stage – in fact, the opposite is true; I couldn’t wait to get out there. I’m just the same today.

Read More...


Tommy Lee on the cover of Maximum Ink in June 2002

Tommy Lee


by Paul Gargano
June 2002

Tommy Lee became synonymous with drumming in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s, his solos setting the standards by which all future drummers would be judged, and his presence one of unparalleled rock ‘n’ roll excess. Since those heralded days in Mötley Crüe, a lot has happened, but Lee’s focus hasn’t shifted. Through tabloid headline after tabloid headline, he’s kept his music close to his heart, all the while, his personal life being run through the American psyche as if it were made for prime time television. And while the hooplah may have been more than most men could handle, in sitting down with Tommy Lee as the release of his sophomore solo effort approaches (this time the project is simply called Tommy Lee, and the album, appropriately, Never A Dull Moment), it’s practically chilling how sound both in mind and body the international superstar has become. It’s as if the more he’s been through, the more he’s learned, and Lee savors the newfound knowledge with an enviable zest for life. The same zest that he applies to his music. On the eve of the band’s departure for the road in support of Lee’s latest solo outing, Maximum Ink sat down with the drummer-turned-frontman to discuss life as an icon, and the albums that have come as a result…

Read More...


Tommy Stinson

Tommy Stinson

Interview with Tommy Stinson of the Replacements and Guns N' Roses
by Joshua Miller
May 2011

For Tommy Stinson, it it can safely be assumed that it’s often easy to get lost behind his history and reputation.  As the bass player for Minneapolis punk rock/alternative rock band the Replacements, Stinson helped craft a new style of rock and roll throughout the 80s.  From the early age of 13 to his early 20s, he joined the band on their furious onslaught of touring across the country and world.  Their live shows were wild, unpredictable and spontaneous, with the band making it up as they went.

Read More...


Tomorrow's Bad Seeds

Tomorrow’s Bad Seeds


by Troy Johnson
January 2012

Tomorrow’s Bad Seeds, is the five member reggae band from Hermosa Beach, California that has been growing exponentially in the last few years. Since they started playing together in 2004, The Seeds have been producing crisp and complex arrangements that have flashes of rock, pop, hip hop, with a predominantly reggae sound that is always apparent. Their lyrics are socially conscious and uplifting. Similar to bands like Sublime, The Wailers, 311, and Slightly Stoopid, they have a positive sound with rythyms that will keep you dancing throughout your day.

It took TBS almost four years of dedication, playing for small audiences, before their popularity caught on. In 2010 they started to play main stages on the Vans Warped Tour, won a JPE music award, and in the beginning of 2011 performed on “The Late Show With Craig Ferguson.” Their commercial success has helped them evolve their sound that is always a work in progress. Lead singer Moises Juarez said about their success,“Being a band that is lucky enough to have done Vans Warped Tour a few times (and again this summer), our minds have been opened to so much music that we never would have heard. There is such an eclectic mix of bands for us to see all day everyday.”

Read More...


Page 129 of 140 pages ‹ First  < 127 128 129 130 131 >  Last ›

Search Maximum Ink's Archives

Partners: Rökker Vodka