Today is: Monday October 23, 2017 | Status: Under Re-development | Version 2.99.03

Latest Articles

Latest first back to the beginning of Time

Sort By: Tina Ayres


Will Hoge

Will Hoge

An interview with Singer/Songwriter Will Hoge
by Tina Hall
February 2014

Will Hoge has produced music ranging from Stones-influenced Rock n’ Roll to Americana, Southern rock, and back roots Country. With his ninth album, “Never Give In”, he offers country music with grit and soul.

Maximum Ink: What was it like growing up in Tennessee? What are some of your most fond recollections from that time in your life?
Will Hoge: Great. My dad played music when I was a kid and getting to be exposed to everything going on in Nashville, I always felt like, was an advantage for me. Music is everywhere.

MI: Do you remember what your very first favorite song was?
WH: Band on The Run - Paul McCartney and Wings. I played the 45 on my Mickey Mouse record player until the needle wore out.

MI: Who were some of your biggest influences musically and personally?
WH: Hank Williams, Ray Charles, The Rolling Stones. I’m reading the new Johnny Cash bio now and love the control he was able to take in the business aspect of his career.


Read More...




Crispin Hellion Glover

An interview with Crispin Hellion Glover
by Tina Hall
January 2014

Crispin Hellion Glover is a man of many talents. He has worked as an actor, screenwriter, director, author, publisher, and recording artist. His best known roles such as George McFly in Back to the Future, the Thin Man in both Charlie’s Angels flicks, Willard Stiles in the remake of Willard, Grendel in Beowulf, The Knave of Hearts in Tim Burton’s Alice inWonderland, and Phil in Hot Tub Time Machine make him one of the most recognizable faces in film.His own company Volcanic Eruptions publishes his lavishly illustrated books and delightfully twisted films. Currently he is set to tour in select cities to promote Crispin Hellion Glover’s Big Slide Show with showings of his filmsIt is fine.EVERYTHING IS FINE! & What is it? Please see his site for specific dates.

Maximum Ink: Can you tell us a little about yourself? What were you like as a kid? How do you think you early years influenced you to be who you are now?
Crispin Hellion Glover: I went to a small private school called Mirman School for Gifted Children. It was an excellent school that was academically oriented. The school was an influence to let me understand that questioning things was very good.
MI: What first led you try your hand at acting and when did you know if was what you had to pursue as a career? Do you think your parents being actors themselves was a positive influence on you to follow your dreams?
CHG: I was in school plays and such, but having watched my father’s career I understood, to a certain extent, how the business worked. I decided it would be something I could do at around age 11. I got an agent at age 13. My parents did not push me into the business. It was something I decided to do by my own volition, but my parents were supportive.
MI: Do people find it hard to believe that Hellion in your middle name? It is a very cool name to carry, are you glad to have it?
CHG: My father Bruce Glover is an actor as I’ve said. In fact he is in Part two of the trilogy It is fine! EVERYTHING IS FINE! People may know him from such films as Diamonds are Forever, Chinatown and the original Walking Tall series. His middle name is Herbert. He never liked his middle name Herbert. So as a young struggling actor in New York he would say to himself “I am Bruce H. Glover, Bruce Hellion Glover. I am a hellion, a troublemaker.” And that would make him feel good. He told my mother this was his real middle name. When they were married she saw him writing on the marriage certificate Bruce Herbert Glover and she thought “Who am I marrying?” They gave Hellion to me as my real middle name. I had always written and drawn as a child and I would always sign my drawing and writing with my whole name Crispin Hellion Glover. When I started acting professionally at 13 which was something I had decided on my own I could do as a profession at a relatively young age it became apparent that I had to choose a professional acting name for SAG. I thought my whole name was too long for acting and just used my first and last name. When I started publishing my books I simply continued using the name I had always used for writing and drawing. This is also why I use my whole name for my films.


Read More...




 - photo by Steve Thornton

Ronnie King

An interview with producer Ronnie King
by Tina Hall
January 2014

Ronnie King is best known for his work producing Tupac Shakur. He has produced such iconic artists as Snoop Dogg, Coolio, Mariah Carey, The Offspring, Kottonmouth Kings, Pepper, and countless others. He can also be found touring with Rancid from time to time. It was my pleasure to sit down with him and learn a little about the man behind the music that is so well loved.

Maximum Ink: Can you tell us a little about your early days? What were you like as a kid?

Ronnie King: As a kid I was always playing music. I came from a musical family of 7 kids my older brothers and sisters where always making music. Then I started studying at 5 years of age and didn’t stop until 2 years into college.

MI: What was it that first sparked your interest in music?

RK: My brother Chuck’s friend John Buccino, who is a great piano player.

MI: What was your very first favorite song?

RK: Mandy by Barry Manilow.

MI: What do you think it takes to make a great song?

RK: Great vision and acting skills.

MI: Why do you think music has always been so well loved throughout the ages?

RK: Everything else loses power in the translation. Music you just sit back and enjoy.


Read More...




Cycle of Pain

An interview with John DeServio of Black Label Society and Cycle of Pain
by Tina Hall
January 2014

Cycle of Pain is one of the most unique bands on the scene today. With members who have also been friends since their teenage years, it has a certain loyalty that has kept it intact through the years. Comprised of John “Jd” DeServio (also of Black Label Society) on bass and vocals, Gregg LoCascio with lead vocals, Joe Taylor on guitar, Bob Panetella on the drums, and Troy Cromwell on keys. The highly anticipated EP Pain Us! is slated for release in early 2014. With the excitement building it was my pleasure to catch up with John to find a little more about the latest offering.

Maximum Ink: For those who might not be familiar with the band, can you tell us a little about how it came into being? 

John DeServio: We’ve been friends and in bands together since we were 14. I got offered a record deal in 2009 and got the band back together.

MI: Do you think the fact that some of you have know each other so long now, has made it easier to keep the band progressing and working well?

JD: To some degree. On the other hand we?e brothers so there’s some hate in there too at times. (laughs)

MI: Do you think loyalty is a rare thing in the music industry today?

JD: Yeah, that’s a thing of the past. If you don’t sell you get no loyalty.

MI: Do you remember what it was that first sparked your love of music?

JD: KISS is solely responsible.


Read More...




Hank Williams Jr.

An interview with the legendary Hank Williams Jr.
by Tina Hall
September 2013

Hank Williams, Jr. needs no introduction. As the son of the late, great Hank Williams, he was surrounded by great music at an early age. First taking the stage at the age of 8 to perform his father’s songs, his early career was guided by his mother Audry Williams who is also said to been a driving force in the success of his father’s career. Since then, he has become a legend in country music. blending southern rock and blues elements in unmistakable fashion. Not only a gifted singer/songwriter, he can also play a host of instruments including guitar, bass, steel guitar, banjo, dobro, piano, harmonica, fiddle, and drums. It was a pleasure to have the chance to bring our readers a little glimpse of the man behind the music.

Maximum Ink: You were only 3 when your father passed. What is the fondest memory of him you have?
Hank Williams Jr.: Well, I didn’t know Daddy, so I really don’t have any memories. I know what people have told me about him taking me to the Grand Ole Opry and leaving me in his guitar case on the side of the stage. The best thing we ever did was record the duet for There’s A Tear In My Beer and we even won a Grammy for it.

MI: You were exposed to great music at an early age. What was it like having such amazing artists stopping by the family home? Which of them stick out most in your mind?
HWJ: Well, Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Fats Domino were at the house a lot and that’s where I learned to boogie-woogie on that piano. Earl Scruggs would come over, as would Johnny and June Carter Cash. By the way, June Carter Cash was my godmother.


Read More...




John Waite

An interview with Singer/Songwriter John Waite
by Tina Hall
August 2013

John Waite began his career in 1975 with the band The Babys, followed by his solo career that spawned the timeless hit Missing You (as later recorded alongside songstress Alison Krauss in 2006). He also enjoyed moderate success as the frontman of Bad English. His last studio album Rough & Tumble featured the ballad If You Ever Get Lonely, co-written by Matchbox Twenty’s Kyle Cook. June 11, 2013 saw the release of the iTunes exclusive Live All Access which featured the song live. The track is also being covered by Love and Theft and is currently climbing the country music charts. He can currently be found on tour in select cities.  I was honored to have the chance to sit down and talk with the man behind the music that we all know and love.

Maximum Ink: Can you tell us a little about yourself as a child? What was it like growing up in Lancaster? When did you first discover the power of music? Can you tell us a little about that?
John Waite: Lancaster is an historic town. It has a castle and a river runs through it. I was raised in a cottage facing into the countryside. There were fields and a huge park opposite the front door. My family was very musical, so music came to me pretty naturally. I joined my brother’s band occasionally to sing R and B or whatever we could think up. Country and Western was huge as a kid as it was songs about cowboys. When you’re 5, it’s all cowboys and Indians. Big Bill Broonzy came next with the blues then Hank Williams and then the Shadows; all incredibly exotic for the northwest of England in the 50’s. I wanted to be a cross between Popeye and Hank the Cowboy. (I’m almost there). I discovered the test card on the T.V. had music playing behind it. There was this sort of Magnificent Seven chord change in the middle. Blew my mind! I used to sit there with my brother waiting for it to come ‘round.

MI: Why do you think music has been such an important entity in society throughout the ages?
JW: I’m not really religious but defiantly spiritual. Music is the closest thing to religion in my life. The only god in this world everyone believes in is money! Frightening, but true. Music is free! Always was.


Read More...




Another Lost Year

Another Lost Year

by Tina Hall
July 2013

Hailing from Charlotte, North Carolina the band Another Lost Year has already gained quite a following. Comprised of Clinton Cunanan, Adam Hall, David Whitaker, Lee Norris, and Jason Lovelace, ALY offer up alternative metal in a way seldom seen in today’s music scene. They have opened for the likes of Hinder, Seven Dust, Skid Row, Candlebox, Pop Evil, and Nonpoint just to name a few.  Their latest single “The War on the Inside” was produced by Justin Rimer (12 Stones, Breaking Point) and offers fans a glimpse at what the newest album “Writing on the Wall” has to offer. Fans can catch them in the WI area July 11th at Club Tavern and Jefferson, WI at the Rox Sports Bar on July 17th.

Maximum Ink: What was it like growing up in North Carolina? What were you like as a child?
Clinton Cunanan: NC is humid, and I loathe humidity. As a child, I was always a good kid, I grew up on a horse farm, my weekends were not all fun and games, I played baseball, that was the only thing that could get me out of the manual labor. Basically the same now, mouthy, said what was on my mind, you know normal kid crap.


Read More...




Travis T. Warren

Travis T. Warren

An interview with Singer/Songwriter Travis T. Warren
by Max Ink Writer List
December 2012

Travis T. Warren, best known for this work as frontman of Blind Melon and in the hard rock duo The Lookout Kids recently released his debut solo album titled Beneath These Borrowed Skies. The album features guests Aja Volkman (Nico Vega), Christopher Thorn (Blind Melon), and Eva Gardner (from Pink’s backing band). All proceeds from the album (out now on Clarity Way Records) go to benefit MusiCares, which provides financial, medical, and, personal support to musicians in need.

Maximum Ink: Can you tell us a little about your background? What was it like growing up in Texas?
Travis T. Warren: Well I grew up in Amarillo which is in the panhandle of Texas. It was and still is a very right leanin kicker town. Not a lot to do but get high, chase girls and play/listen to music. I left for California a month after I turned 17 and never looked back. Texas has great steaks if you’re into that sort of thing.Great Tex-Mex food as well

MI: What is your fondest memory from that time?
TTW: Friends. I had a lot of great friends from that time. I’m still very close to a few of them to this day. We were a brotherhood. Very tight. We did everything together. Skipped school. Got high. Stayed up through the night having long, philosophical conversations about what we were going to do when we got older. Beer runs. Ya know that sort of shit.


Read More...




2602 ViewsPermalinkTravis T. Warren Website
Kuba Ka

Kuba Ka

An interview with international singer, dancer, actor Kuba Ka
by Tina Hall
July 2012

Kuba Ka first gained noticed as one of the greatest men of 2001 in the Polish version of Elle magazine while only a teenager. He is a singer, dancer, and actor. Kuba is likely best known for his work at Las Vegas’  Kuba project with renowned architect Tom Wright(Atkins Global) who also created the seven star hotel, Burj Al Arab in Abu Dubai. A mainstay in radio, television, and stage in Europe for over a decade Ka is also the first artist after Michael Jackson to be represented by Frank Dileo. Most recently he released the video to In the Streets.

Maximum Ink: Can you tell us a little about your background? Where are you from and how do you think coming from where you have has influenced you to be who you are today?
Kuba Ka: I was born in Poland, where I started my entertainment career as child and then teenage performer. It felt amazing when I was doing in that country American styled shows, what audience of all ages really enjoyed. I became the voice for United Nations and UNICEF, what allowed me to do KUBA & Friends charity show, with 30 major stars including Oscar winning actress - Vanessa Redgrave. I was then 15 years old. This all journey made me sure that dreams are possible, and that I want to use my entertainer’s power to shine the light of entertainment in darkest places of the World, like Africa. My performance truly reflects all me, and all my life. I don’t separate stage from my private life. It’s one,  and I guess that’s why I am blessed to share this great for me adventure, with top industry people, like it was with Michael Jackson’s manager Frank Dileo.

MI: Who are some of your earliest influences?
KK: Ha, well I always loved legends, from Charlie Chaplin, to Elvis, Michael Jackson, The Rolling Stones, Tina Turner, Eminem. I love entertainers, people with big time experience. I like to listen to singers, but I follow people with this “more” of the spectacle.


Read More...




1845 ViewsPermalinkKuba Ka Website
Jett Williams at the age of 2.

Jett Williams

An interview with songstress Jett Williams
by Tina Hall
July 2012

Jett Williams came into the world five days after the passing of her father the legendary Hank Williams. Adopted by his mother Lillian who went on to die two weeks later Jett was left a ward of the state of Alabama until she was later adopted. Jett herself made her singing debut in 1989 and was later backed by her father’s old band The Drifting Cowboys. She has since appeared in numerous shows in the U.S, Japan, Holland, Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Spain, and Canada. Her autobiography Ain’t Nothing As Sweet As My Baby sheds light on a life that is hard to imagine. She has undertaken the role of continuing the legacy left by her father with a passion that is highly admirable. Jett can be heard on the soundtrack for the film The Last Ride, which details the last hours of her father’s life. It was an honor to sit down with her and catch up on what had made her who she is today.


Maximum Ink: For those who haven’t read your book and might not be familiar with your story, can you tell us a little about that?
Jett Williams: On October 15, 1952 Hank Williams signed a notarized document admitting paternity and taking custody of his unborn child, boy or girl, healthy or unhealthy. It also provided that his mother, my grandmother, would raise me for the first two years of my life.  Additionally, my mother, who lived with my dad in his mother’s boarding house in Montgomery, AL during the 5 or so months of her pregnancy, got and took a one way ticket to the place of her choice in California.

My father, who prepaid all the expenses for my birth before leaving on his last ride to the concerts he never gave, just didn’t count on dying at 29. He was pronounced dead January 1, 1953; his funeral was on the 4th and I was born before the sun came up on the 6th.

My grandmother insisted on taking and raising me. My mother did not object. A compromised lawyer suggested to her that she should adopt me. She did for the right reasons. He made the recommendation for the wrong ones, because under Alabama law at the time an adopted child could not inherit.

It took my grandmother 2 years to complete the adoption and she died two weeks later. The family no longer wanted me and while she lay in state in the parlor Hank’s sister and his ex-wife Audrey decided to make me a ward of the state and the next day I was an orphan going to foster homes and then later adopted again.

I grew up not knowing who I was, until I met an attorney, Keith Adkinson, whom I later married. He got his hands on the October 15th agreement. I was satisfied at having my questions answered with the bonus of knowing I was wanted and provided for. He was not satisfied and we ultimately sued those motivated by keeping my inheritance from me and for themselves. We prevailed, after 9 years of litigation.


Read More...




Page 3 of 13 pages  < 1 2 3 4 5 >  Last ›

Search Maximum Ink's Archives

Partners: Rökker Vodka