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Bobaflex

Bobaflex

An interview with vocalist and guitarist Marty McCoy
by Aaron Manogue
September 2011

As most of you know, the music industry is such an incredibly volatile place right now. With the ever increasing emergence of digital downloads, online radio, and other technologies constantly changing the landscape, it makes it even harder for bands to survive or make a decent living at their art. That’s why it’s so hard to meet bands that are truly good people and in it for the right reason; to make kick ass music that people genuinely relate to and enjoy. The epitome of this type of band has to be the good ‘ol boys from West Virginia, Bobaflex. Never have I come across a group of super-talented musicians who are humble and down to Earth. They’ve been through just about every bullshit situation a band could go through and survive yet Bobaflex has done much more than that. They’ve taken the situations they’ve had to deal with and let it make them even stronger. Vocalist and guitarist Marty McCoy talks with Maximum Ink’s Aaron Manogue about the band’s new album “Hell in My Heart,” System of a Down, Simon & Garfunkel and 94.1 WJJO.

Maximum Ink: Talk to me about playing WJJO’s Taste of Madison stage Labor Day weekend with that kickass backdrop and playing for JJO again. What’s it like?
Marty McCoy: Oh my gosh, man! It just feels like; I don’t even know what it feels like! When I was looking at that capital singing, I was just like, “Sing your lines and quit staring at the background.” JJO and Madison, Wisconsin is just one of those places that are blue-collar, hard fucking rock towns. That station is so cool, it does what it wants and you can actually call the program director (Randy Hawke) and he’s nice as hell, he takes chances and he listens. He reads all the numbers and stuff but he takes chances on bands that he thinks are cool. And that’s the way the town is, the way that station is; Madison just has that vibe that everything is cool man.


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Chaol Revolution Theory (Ryan, James, Nick)

Chaos Revolution Theory

An interview with Chaos Revolution Theory
by Aaron Manogue
September 2011

Being from a town like Madison, Wisconsin, it’s hard to stick out from the crowd, considering Madison just so happens to be one of the best cities in the nation for local, undiscovered music. The city is so diverse in the type of music that comes out is all over the map, and you’re bound to find mixtures of music blended into one. So when I came across the band Chaos Revolution Theory, I thought to myself, “This is definitely Madison music!” Chaos Revolution Theory is the perfect mix of groove, funk and progressive rock all concocted together to make music that seems like it could fit on the iPod playlist or record shelf of anyone who simply enjoys music. Maximum Ink’s Aaron Manogue sat down with the Madison natives to talk about their music and where it all started.

Maximum Ink: How long have you guys been a band and how did you guys come about being a band?
Nick “Shaggy” Stanecki (Vocalist and Guitar): Two years on September 9th. Ryan and I met through our respective bands that played with each other in the Madison scene here a few years ago. When our bands ended around the same time, we joined forces, intent on starting a new sound all together. Ryan and I truly started from the bottom. Acoustic radio performances were some of our first shows because we had no songs and couldn’t even consider playing a full set at a club. We pretty much hid out in the studio, and did a lot of experimentation. We really wanted to make a unique, but very real -to us- sound. We had been using reggae and ska type parts for years, mashed with surfy west coast riffing.


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 - photo by Rob Fenn

On the Road…Where Music Lives

An interview with photographer, author, music connoisseur Rob Fenn
by Aaron Manogue
September 2011

We can all remember the days when our favorite band was releasing their latest album, and we’d rush to the local record store as soon as it opened that day. The feeling when you finally saw the cover art of the album sitting on the store shelf, what the packaging was like, everything. The sad part about these great memories most of us have, is that with the emergence digital music distribution, most of the younger generation will never, ever experience this. iTunes makes it possible for people to have the music the very minute it’s released. No cover art (except usually for a downloadable one), no anticipation of opening the packaging, no experience. This is the idea that music photographer, ex-radio host, web designer (we might as well just call him a music connoisseur) Rob Fenn was acting on when he started “On the Road…Where the Music Lives”

“The project came about when my daughter’s idea of a record store was iTunes. I was like, NO! I explained to her how cool it was to hang out at the store and check out new music. As I was telling her this, I realized that I don’t do that anymore, either. So as part of her allowance she gets to by one album a week from a record store. Even though I am not a big fan of her musical taste, other than she is a huge In This Moment fan, we are on the same music page with that and it has been so cool to hang out with my kid and flip through music at the record stores all over. We hit them all from Best Buy and FYE to the Heavy Metal Shop in Salt Lake City, UT.”


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Ted Nugent

Ted Nugent

An interview with Guitarist/Wildman Ted Nugent
by Aaron Manogue
September 2011

Over the past fifty years, there have been literally hundreds of thousands of bands and musicians in the business. There have been some successful bands, some not so successful and a very select few that have become icons of rock n’ roll. Out of all of the musicians and bands there have been, there is only one Ted Nugent. In the past 50 years, Ted Nugent has done things that most musicians could only ever dream of, including setting attendance records at venues worldwide in 2005 and ‘06, was the top grossing act in the world in 1977, ‘78 & ‘79, and has sold over 30 million records worldwide. His number one weapon, while on stage at least, is his trademark Gibson Byrdland. Some of his most famous riffs, and it just so happens some of rock n’ rolls most recognizable riffs, were written by him on this guitar.

“The mighty Gibson Byrdland guitar is a magical piece of American craftsman artwork that has a musical voice all its own. A beast of an instrument that was created to provide a limitless pallet for creative sonic bombast and musical adventure that called my name from the very 1st time I witnessed its power in the hands of Jimmy McCarty of Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels way back around 1961. This custom guitar is capable of more sounds than a normal human being is capable of dreaming of. But since I am not a normal human being, our love affair continues to produce soul cleansing and crotch inspiring sounds and love songs for the masses,” Nugent said.


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Kittie

An interview with vocalist/guitarist Morgan Lander
by Aaron Manogue
September 2011

Is it just me or does it seem like the biggest thing in hard rock and metal lately is to throw a pretty face up on stage and hand her a microphone and pray that the fans take notice? Record labels using the age-old sex appeal to sell records. The thing that happens then typically, is that pretty face is nothing more than just that, a pretty face. This isn’t the case when it comes to the metal shredders in Kittie. Not only do they all have that pretty face to start off, but then they leave your asses thinking, “What the hell is this? I love it!” The femme-fatale quartet are maidens of destruction on their new album “I’ve Failed You” and continue to produce high-quality, ass-kicking metal that erases the underlying notion of an all-female metal band. They’ve demolished so many mosh pits and ruptured so many ear drums that they are simply a bad ass metal band with immense talent and enviable stage presence.  Maximum Ink’s Aaron Manogue sat down with lead vocalist and guitarist Morgan Lander to talk about why they chose metal, their new album and the personal struggle purveyed throughout it.


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Theory of a Deaman

Theory of a Deadman

An interview with lead singer Tyler Connolly of Theory of a Deadman
by Aaron Manogue
August 2011

Humor is a part of most happy people’s lives every single day. It’s one of those things that no matter who you are, where you’re from or how old you are, you can brighten someone’s day by making them laugh. There are all kinds of comedians that make a decent buck off of it, but very few musicians can do it and still be taken seriously. Theory of a Deadman is one of those bands that can make you laugh and cry in the same verse. They write music that anyone can relate to, whether it be about a break up or about life in general, when you listen to their music you feel as if you’re a part of their story, because you are. Vocalist Tyler Connolly spoke with Maximum Ink’s Aaron Manogue about why humor is such a big part of their music, their latest album The Truth Is, and their upcoming appearance headlining The Carnival of Madness 2011 Tour.

Maximum Ink: Your single “Lowlife” has kind of catapulted your new record The Truth Is. Tell me what that song means to you or what you meant it to mean to the fans.
Tyler Connolly: Basically, it’s just one of those “Don’t judge what you don’t know” kinds of things, you know? We’ve done so many festivals and just looking out at the audience and seeing chick fights and kick ass hillbillies. And you know it’s more of a song saying it’s ok to be a hillbilly because a lot of them are our fans. That’s pretty much what it means.


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Black Stone Cherry by Travis Shinn - photo by Travis Shinn

Black Stone Cherry

An interview with lead guitarist Ben Wells of Black Stone Cherry
by Aaron Manogue
July 2011

When anyone says the words “southern rock,” most people think of the days back in the ‘70’s when The Allman Brothers and Lynyrd Skynyrd reigned as the kings of rock n’ roll with their legendary guitar riffs and serene vocals. In their day, they were pioneers in the type of sound that they brought to the music scene in combining rock, country and blues into a new breed of music. Although southern rock definitely has it’s place in the rock n’ roll scene today, the band Black Stone Cherry has to be the most intriguing of the bunch. The band’s new record “Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea” is nothing short of kick ass. The boys from Kentucky have made their own musical concoction, just as their southern rock predecessors did. There’s definitely still that distinctive southern rock ring to the entire album, but they’ve sprinkled feels of nu metal and mainstream hook throughout. The result is one of the funnest albums to listen to this year. Maximum Ink’s Aaron Manogue spoke with lead guitarist Ben Wells about their incredibly unique sound, the eclectic sound on their new record, and their upcoming performance August 13 in Twin Lakes, WI for the WIIL Rock the Ranch show.

Maximum Ink: What do you think it is that really gives your band the incredibly unique sound that you have built your reputation off of?
Ben Wells: I think the fact that we are from a small town in Kentucky and the fact that we didn’t have a music scene to fit into growing up has a lot to do with the way we sound. We grew up fans of blues, country, classic rock, folk, etc. and wanted to have pieces of that in our music!


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Egypt Central

An interview with vocalist John Falls of Egypt Central
by Aaron Manogue
June 2011

This summer is filled with new music and great new sounds.  One of the most evident marks on summer 2011 has been the release of Egypt Central’s sophomore album White Rabbit.  The album hellishly paints a picture of a series of events and consequences that occur when one accepts or declines the heralded “White Rabbit.” The album is laced with hard riffs, catchy lyrics and more hooks than a fisherman’s tackle box. Maximum Ink’s Aaron Manogue sat down with vocalist John Falls to discuss Summerfest, WJJO Band Camp and their latest album.

Maximum Ink: What’s it like to play Summerfest and Band Camp and these huge shows alongside other great bands that are out there today?
John Falls: We’ve been fortunate to play Summerfest before and this will be our first Band Camp. We’ve played for JJO quite a few times so to finally get an invite to Band Camp is awesome. But it’s weird on the festival circuit you get to know everyone pretty quickly because usually it’s the same bands that are out at that time. That’s another cool aspect of it is that there’s ten to twenty bands that happen to be putting out records that year.


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Burn Halo

Burn Halo

An Interview with vocalist James Hart of Burn Halo
by Aaron Manogue
June 2011

Perseverance seems to be a word that many of today’s bands have become quite familiar with over the years.  This is no different for Burn Halo’s vocalist James Hart. After nearly a decade of touring and recording with his previous band 18 Visions, Hart has found himself a new home through another avenue or musicianship. Burn Halo has come onto the scene with a vengeance and has reached even higher heights then Hart’s previous work. They’ve recently been added to the lineup at the illustrious 2011 94.1 WJJO Band Camp and the honor has Hart excited and ready to prove to you all, that Burn Halo belongs on that stage. Maximum Ink’s Aaron Manogue talked with James Hart about what it’s going to be like playing Band Camp, outdoor music festivals and even why someone stole his bike when he was younger!

Maximum Ink: You guys are slated to play 94.1 WJJO Band Camp at the end of July. What’s it like to have the opportunity to play such a huge festival with so many other killer bands?
James Hart: These types of shows are always a great time. It really gives us a chance to showcase our music and talents as well as validate why WJJO wanted to put us on the show. With so many great bands in one day, you really want to bring your A game. You want to be able to stand out. You want people walking away from the festival talking about your band with CD in hand.


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Sick Puppies

Sick Puppies

An interview with bassist of Sick Puppies Emma Anzai
by Aaron Manogue
June 2011

Perhaps the biggest compliment that you can pay to a festival such as Summerfest isn’t mentioning that it’s the largest music festival in the entire world. Yes, this is a huge feat considering the size of the festivals in Europe, but it’s still not the biggest compliment. The biggest compliment must be that every musician we seem to talk to views playing Summerfest as one of the highest honors that a band can receive. This idea is no different for Emma Anzai of Sick Puppies. Maximum Ink spoke with Emma about what an honor it is to play Summerfest, her past experiences there, and what’s next for the Australian rock ‘n’ rollers.

Maximum Ink: You guys are slated to play Summerfest on July 6. What’s it like to be able to play the at world’s largest music festival and play on the same stage as some of music’s most talented musicians?
Emma Anzai: It’s pretty surreal and I don’t think it’ll ever stop being that way for us. We can’t wait to check out the artists on this year’s lineup.


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