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 - photo by Kevin Estrada

Filter’s Richard Patrick, Leading The Rock Renaissance

by Mario Martin
May 2013

Somewhere along the line, rock got lost in the shuffle. More importance has been placed on celebrity and tabloids than the music. You might as well have seen rock turning up on milk cartons as fans desperately searched for it in a sea of pop and reality television. But a bright light has peaked through. That light provides hope. Amongst fabricated musical acts on derivative variety shows, original music is that ray of light. And more literally, The Sun Comes Out Tonight is the light leading Filter’s forthcoming success. Led by the enigmatic Richard Patrick, Filter is returning to form. With songs that are just as gentle as they are intimidating, a renaissance is beginning to stir. Amen. Rock is found, filtered…

While little is readily available about Patrick, he’s a humble guy. He’s intelligent and articulate, and while he’s impassioned, he is endearing. Taking in a conversation from backstage in Colorado Springs as Filter kicks off its headlining tour, Patrick alerts me to the fact Colorado Springs is a starting point for the band


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Die Kreuzen

Die Kreuzen

“Gone Away” But Not Forgotten, Back For A Limited Time Only
by Sal Serio
May 2013

I turned 18 in 1981. Like many others who transformed from boys to young men in the early 80s, it was a time of confusion, but also one of excitement. America’s socio- political landscape had radically changed to one of conservatism and military intervention during the Reagan regime, and equally as turbulent was the beloved institution of rock and roll. Mainstays of arena rock were suddenly seen as antiquated… out of touch with a new look and attitude. Punk had taken over, and given the agitation of the times, it’s no wonder.

Much appreciated about the punk movement was how the barrier between musician and audience was broken down. In the 70s, chances were unlikely that a pimply-faced young dude would get to hang out with one of his heroes. This privilege was almost exclusively reserved for pretty girls. Likewise, to become a popular rocker seemed a nearly unobtainable quest. With punk, the fans all had their own bands, and many times the venues did not even have stages. We all stood on the same ground, and we all drank from the same keg when the show was over.

Which is not to say we didn’t have bands to look up to. When I joined my first punk band in 1983, we all brought a lot of influences to the table, but our commonality was that we wanted to be like Black Flag and Die Kreuzen.


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Colorphase

Madison Quartet Rides Grooves Hard, Fast, and Tight
by Dan Vierck
May 2013

If Colorphase is a bandwagon, it’s a party bus. And you better get on before the only seats you can find are the nosebleeds.


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2079 ViewsPermalinkColorphase Website

DJ Trichrome

by Andrew Frey
May 2013

I had to agree with Willy Wonka, AKA DJ Trichrome when, in a recent email interview, he noted, “There’s a lot of negativity in the world and Reggae Music is so positive. People need that in their lives now more than ever.”

With this in mind, he made a special dedication for 2013, “For this year, my motto is One Love.


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3623 ViewsPermalinkDJ Trichrome Website
Parquet Courts

Parquet Courts

An Interview with Parquet Courts Lead Singer Andrew Savage
by John Noyd
May 2013

Rising indie stars Parquet Courts combine scrawny garage-rock blues with tight-fisted riffs, savvy post-punk taffy and brawny honesty. In preparation for their highly-anticipated visit to Madison’s High Noon Saloon June 22nd, we cornered lead singer Andrew Savage for some background on the band.

Maximum Ink: Where does the name Parquet Courts come from?
Andrew Savage: Well, Parquet is a type of geometric arrangement of wood pieces; surely you’ve seen them on the basketball court at the Boston Gardens (home of the Boston Celtics). Sean is from Boston, so it’s kinda an homage to him, since everybody assumes he is from Texas, by association. 

MI: You’re a New York band, but have roots in Texas; what prompted the move to Brooklyn?
AS: Three of us are from Texas.  Max left Texas to go to college.  For Austin and I, it was just getting out of a college town (the town I was born in, I should mention).  Also, nothing wrong with college towns. 
 
MI: What sort of day jobs did the band have before they decided to make the band their full-time focus?
AS: Actually, we still have day jobs.  I work as a bike delivery boy, Max is a private tutor, and Sean is a freelance writer.


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Sky Road Fly Band Photo by Nick Berard - photo by Nick Berard

The Sky Road Fly

An Interview with Sky Road Fly
by Max Ink
June 2013

After a brief sample of the early mixes, I sat down with the guys to discuss the new album, their creative energy, and what the future holds.  Sky Road Fly has crafted an effort that establishes them as a musical force to be reckoned with in the Madison scene, and they were happy to share their thoughts and ambitions.

What has the recording process been like?  How was it different than “Pure Danger”?
RH: Its safe to say that we’re at the quality of Smart Studios, if not beating it.  At Smart, we had to work around somewhat of a schedule, so it took a long time because we had to hop in whenever it was available. 
BJ: Here there’s an opportunity everyday to work.  We can really look at things closer here.


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