Today is: Saturday December 16, 2017 | Status: Under Re-development | Version 2.99.03

Articles in Reverse

Looking at history from the oldest first

Sort By: Year 2014


Barrelhouse Chuck

Barrelhouse Chuck

by Dave Leucinger
July 2014

In any conversation with blues piano master Barrelhouse Chuck, finding a topic to discuss is remarkably easy – as long as it relates in some way to blues piano or organ. Fueled by an unmatched zeal and boldness, he has crafted his career through repeatedly seeking out his idols –and then asking for their mentoring.

The keyboard instruments have been a part of his life from the start. “As a young kid, my mother had a piano. She played church hymns,” Chuck said. “At age 3, 4, 5 – there was always a piano around. And we had an old pump organ in the basement.” But his mother’s sacred music didn’t form Chuck’s direction. “I just made up songs; I never really had any gospel influence in my music,” he said. “It was just the instrument. When you have an instrument in the house – you just sit around and doodle. I don’t read a note and never had any lessons.”


Read More...

The Steepwater Band

The Steepwater Band

by Mike Huberty
July 2014

Chicago Roots-Rock veterans, THE STEEPWATER BAND, have been playing their hearts out all over the world for nearly two decades. Forming in 1998, their raw, gritty, and bluesy sound, which started as a trio and has expanded to a quartet, fits perfectly in the retro-world of THE BLACK KEYS and RIVAL SONS. A band with a hometown attitude but a national profile, you may have heard their songs on television shows like “NCIS”, “Dangerous Games”, “Vegas”, or “The Good Wife”. Or maybe in movies like “The Five-Year Engagement” or “One For The Money”. They’ve established themselves as a fantastic ambassador for the Chicago scene (they even do an event called Illicana, which features bands from the Land of Lincoln playing Americana tracks.) Real deal road warriors, their tour schedule in just July ranges from Milwaukee’s Summerfest to Blues Festivals in Italy, Australia, and Switzerland(!) We took a few minutes to talk with guitarist and vocalist Jeff Massey to preview their upcoming appearance at Atwood Summerfest on July 27th.

Maximum Ink: What’s the best song to listen to for someone who hasn’t heard Steepwater before?
Jeff Massey: Hmmmm. That’s tricky picking one. I’m going to say the song, “Dance Me A Number”. The reason I pick this particular tune is because we run into a lot of new faces coming out to see our show strictly because they heard this song. It’s been getting a ton of airplay, primarily on streaming radio like Pandora and Spotify.

MI: What was the inspiration behind it?
JM: It was an instrumental song I had been playing around with on acoustic guitar for a few months before I decided to add lyrics. Lyrically, it’s inspired by the concept of living in the moment, enjoying each and every day and not being hung up on what the future holds. The whole inspiration, musically, came from messing around with an odd guitar tuning and turning it into an electric number with the band involved sent it over the top.


Read More...

The Delta Routine

The Delta Routine

by Mike Huberty
July 2014

Maybe it’s all the pretense of producer teams and their made-for-TMZ Pop divas and the “just press play” live shows of Electronic Dance Music that’s forced Rock music to go back to its very beginnings. In an era where people can make a record on their laptop and viral YouTube videos are routinely made with a mobile phone, the natural sounds of a band that can really play their instruments to an audience that just wants to get down seems almost quaint. If a musician can just straight up play guitar or sing their guts out in a band onstage on a Friday night somewhere, it seems old-fashioned in a world of “everyone’s a star” karaoke and televised singing contests where melismatic teenagers fight over who’s prettiest. So when you hear THE DELTA ROUTINE, a straight up rock band from Milwaukee that takes the best elements from the founding fathers of the genre, it’s a genuine delight to hear a genuine mix of rock n’ roll mayhem that combines the swagger of THE ROLLING STONES, the energy of THE BLACK CROWES, and the modern sounds of THE STROKES. Consisting of Nick Amadeus on lead vocals and guitar, Al Kraemer on keyboards, Victor Buell IV on guitar, Evan Paydon on bass, and Kyle Ciske on drums, they’ve released three full albums, the latest being “Cigarettes & Caffeine Nightmares”. In 2011 the band won Milwaukee radio 88.9’s Milwaukee Band of the Year award as well as Alternative Band of the Year at the Wisconsin Area Music Industry awards. Also, in true Wisconsin beer-drinking spirit, THE DELTA ROUTINE has also been featured in an ad for Chippewa Falls-brewed (and Miller-owned) Leinenkugel’s. After making an appearance at Milwaukee’s Summerfest on Thursday, July 3rd, they’ll be performing in Madison at Atwood Summerfest on Saturday July 26th. With a voice that sounds a little like Noel Gallagher got in a drunken fistfight with Satisfaction-era Mick Jagger, we talked to Nick Amadeus about the band and their upcoming Atwood performance.

Maximum Ink: What’s the single? What track would you want people to hear that hasn’t heard THE DELTA ROUTINE before?
Nick Amadeus: There are probably a few, but I guess one of my favorite songs would be ‘I Wait Alone’ off our 2012 release ‘Cigarettes and Caffeine Nightmares’.


Read More...

Hed PE

Hed PE

An interview with guitarist Jackson Benge
by Tina Ayres
July 2014

Hed PE is back with their ninth studio album to the delight of American Rapcore fans everywhere. Their latest offering, Evolution, is slated for release this July on Pavement Entertainment. Comprised of Jared Gomes(vocals), Mawk(bass), Jackson Benge(guitar) , and Trauma(drums) the band is back with sounds heavier than ever.

Maximum Ink: What were you like as a child growing up? What would you say are your fondest memories of that time?
Jackson Benge: I was a hyper kid. My grade school teachers would always write the same types of comments on my report cards; “He has a lot of energy,” or, “Distracts other kids.” I couldn’t keep still and couldn’t stop staring at the clouds. My imagination was my best friend and I used to love to draw. One of my fondest memories growing up was the first time I rode a bicycle without training wheels. As long as my memory is still intact, that will remain among the fondest.

MI: How old were you when you wrote your first song? Do you remember what it was about?
JB: I was about 15 or 16 years old when I wrote one of my first actual songs. Believe it or not, I wrote the lyrics as well. It was called, “Hold On,” and it was a cross between “Earth Angel” by the Penguins and “Don’t Cry” by Guns ‘n’ Roses. It was a simple love song about wanting to be with a girl you can’t have. At the time, many girls around me seemed to like that song, so I guess it was a relative success.

MI: Are you excited to be releasing your ninth studio album on Pavement Entertainment?
JB: “Evolution” is our 9th studio release and it’s always exciting to put out a new record, especially with a label like Pavement, which clearly has a solid grasp on how to treat their artists. The team we now have working with us is incredible. When I talk to others who have worked with Pavement, they have nothing but great things to say about them as well.


Read More...

The Dead Daisies

The Dead Daisies

An interview with Guitarist Richard Fortus
by Tina Ayres
July 2014

Richard Fortus has graced the stage with artists like Rihanna, The Psychedelic Furs, Nena, Love Spit Love, Honky Toast, The Compulsions, Thin Lizzy, and Guns N’ Roses, with a stage presence that is nothing short of amazing. His work with the music production company “Compound” has been featured in various tv, film, advertising and video game projects. Fans of the former television show Charmed have enjoyed his work on the theme song, as well. His work ethic and drive led to his being one of the most sought after first call sessions artists in NYC. He recently joined forces with the band The Dead Daisies. It is my pleasure to bring our readers a little more information on the latest project.

Maximum Ink: Where are you from? What were you like as a child? What would you say are your most fond memories from that time?
Richard Fortus:
I’m from Saint Louis. I started playing violin and drums around 4 or 5 years old. I didn’t pick up guitar till I was around 13. I don’t think I was a bad kid. I got in to some trouble, but I wasn’t too bad. I really fell in love with rock n’ roll at an early age and used to go to every concert that I could. It didn’t matter if I was really a fan of the band or not, if they came to St Louis, I went. I definitely have a lot of great memories from shows.

MI: What do you love most about the act of making music?
RF:
The spiritual high that is achievable through music is unlike anything else. It’s a place where you are completely out of your body and mind and are acting only as a conduit or channel. It’s something that I’m also chasing. My primary objective is to reach that place every night. Some nights it happens, sometimes it doesn’t. When it does, it is bliss. 

MI: Why do you think music has always had such an appeal through the ages?
RF:
For THAT reason! Music is a spiritual experience for the musician and the listener. It can move you unlike any other art form. It’s immediate and can be incredibly powerful.

MI: What advice would you offer those wishing to learn to music regardless of their instrument of choice?
RF:
You have to love it so much, that it possesses your body and soul. If you don’t have that passionate love, you will never be great. That is, of course, only if you want to seriously make music a career. If not, as long as you enjoy doing it, you are doing the right thing!


Read More...

Pitchfork Festival Chicago 2014

Pitchfork Festival Chicago 2014

Three Days of Great Music and then some
by John Noyd
July 2014

Amazingly free of major technical glitches, obnoxious partiers and garish advertisers there was a lot to like about this year’s Pitchfork Festival in Chicago. The weather was a blessing, the diverse line-up top-rate and the eye-candy ranged from chic bohemian to vintage hipster. Tats, hats and mustache wax, free Tacos and Twinkies dispensed at one end and free flowers and sunscreen on the other, plus cutting-edge indie-rock, electro-pop and hip-hop smack dab in the middle. To call it manageable underscores how hard it is to fed and please 20,000 people, but after years of practice Pitchfork has it down pat.

Several alumni moved up from side stages to stronger standing this year. A lively and upbeat SHARON VAN ETTEN returned with a tightly-knit band after braving the festival a few years ago accompanying herself on guitar; going from mind-blowing loops and a ukulele, the ever-exotic TUNE-YARDS upgraded to a colorful posse of talented singers and a second drummer while the previously rained-on CLOUD NOTHINGS found sunshine and thunderous applause. From how dark sunglasses complimented the all-black attire of the DUM DUM GIRLS to the smarmy, hearty, “good morning,” Chicago’s own TWIN PEAKS gave when they began their pummeling set Saturday afternoon, each act adapted to their open-air surroundings with the quietest tunes heard clearly and only the most bombastic bass occasionally bleeding onto other stages.

Measurable festival success came from unexpected encounters; whether it was the warm fuzzy feeling seeing that two-year old in The Smiths t-shirt, the subtle puzzlement from the awkward, “white people,” comment from SUN KIL MOON or simply the giddy thrill of NENEH CHERRY performing Stateside for only the second time ever.  From the cheesy glee of EARL SWEATSHIRT asking you to sing Journey’s, “Don’t Stop Believin’,” to the waxing nostalgia watching seeing Generation Z dance to the late great Donna Summer via GIORGIO MORODER; there were plenty of reasons to feel the feel-good vibes.

Luck may have placed you in the mosh-pit when TWIN PEAKS suddenly threw the body of a smashed guitar into the crowd, being given MAJICAL CLOUDZ’s microphone to tell a joke while they valiantly tried to fix a midi controller they later destroyed on stage or simply standing in the right spot to catch a rose from GRIMES as her dueling dancers and wind-blown hair animated a absolutely techno-groovy set. Giant video screens allowed people far away to witness ST. VINCENT wriggling on her back shredding guitar, dream weavers HUNDRED WATERS lacing cyber-swollen soul with flute or BECK placing crime scene tape across the stage. Other scenes flew under the camera’s watchful eyes; a stranger fainting, security firmly informing tokers the Blue Stage is hundred feet from a church that houses a school or standing nearby when one dude was compelled to tell everyone to go F themselves. So whether you spent the entire long weekend or just ended up catching parts of the live webcast, Pitchfork Chicago succeeded in furthering the cause to bring musical talent to the yearning masses.


Read More...

Page 7 of 12 pages ‹ First  < 5 6 7 8 9 >  Last ›

Search Maximum Ink's Archives

Partners: Rökker Vodka