Today is: Wednesday November 14, 2018 | Status: Under Re-development | Version 2.99.03

Articles in Reverse

Looking at history from the oldest first

Sort By: Year 2014


Living Statues on the cover of Maximum Ink for April 2014 - photo by Adrienne D. Williams

The Living Statues

by Mike Huberty
April 2014

Melding a classic garage sound with British Invasion hooks and the straight-up timeless rock n’ roll fashion sense, Milwaukee’s THE LIVING STATUES have been blazing a trail through the Midwest like a hot rod since their formation in 2012. Their first EP, Knockin’, is released on Tuesday April 8th. We took a few minutes to talk to Tommy Shears (guitarist and lead vocals), Chris Morales (drums and vocals), and Alex Thornburg (bass and vocals) about how the group got together, excitement over their new release, and their near-future plans.


Read More...

2033 ViewsPermalinkLiving Statues Website
Dead Rider

Dead Rider

An Interview with Dead Rider's guitar guru Todd Rittmann
by John Noyd
April 2014

Never content to do the same thing twice, Chicago’s daredevil experimentalists DEAD RIDER, offer a dazzling degree of forward-thinking adventures whose restless quests invest discordant morsels of jazz-rock logic into funky electro-polished grooves. Comprised of Matthew Espy (drums, conga, percussion), Andrea Faught (synth, piano, trumpet, trombone, vocals), Thymme Jones (synth, trumpet, vocals) and Todd Rittmann (vocals, guitar, drums), the imaginative foursome blaze new trails thinking outside the box, bashing pre-conceived beliefs by conjuring jarring carnage buffered in teeth-gnashing acrobatics and gut-busting bluster. In anticipation of their performance May 8th at Madison’s The Frequency,” MAXIMUM INK asked front-man and founder Todd Rittman to guide us through the band’s insatiable appetite for complex maneuvers and esoteric minutiae

MAXIMUM INK: As a band committed to unexpected twists and challenging their audience, do your live shows attempt to play songs from your records, use them as launch pads for further sonic explorations or something in between?

TODD RITTMANN: Well, a little of both I guess. It’s funny; the songs on our records that sound loose and more improvised are the ones that are actually hyper composed. They are the ones we are the most dedicated to replicating in a fairly precise way. The songs that have more of a traditional (for us anyway) pop structure end up being the ones we corrupt when performed.

MI: No one seems to be doing quite what you do, as innovators who fuse so many divergent styles together, who do you see as your contemporaries?

TR: I love any artist that creates their own language and musical world. I love Deerhoof, Battles, Cody Chesnutt, Buke and Gase, and I’ve been really digging this local kid Vic Mensa lately. The hardest and most important thing to do as an artist is be yourself, anyone who can get there is automatically inspiring and worth checking out.

MI: What influenced or inspired this album? Was there a premeditative theme or concept behind Chills on Glass to focus your creative impulses?

TR: We work in a very organic and flowing way. There is never a premeditated theme but one always seems to emerge at some point. When it does we try to surf that wave a little without it turning into some kind of concept-rock-opera kind of thing.

MI: How should your fans interpret the title beyond a vivid description of your subversive mirth?

TR: The title connects the dots between drug imagery and how we interact with technology. Both things have their ups and downs and both seem to work in a similar way with our brains. Chills is my slang for children but also alludes to a numbness… Glass is the ubiquitous screen or display and also the easiest surface on which to serve drugs in powdered form.


Read More...

CONVOY! - photo by Marty Waitkoss

Convoy

Putting some "Blue Collar America" back in to Rock 'n Roll
by Sal Serio
April 2014

There are only a handful of local/regional bands that have immediately gotten into my consciousness and altered my DNA like Convoy has. There’s just something about the ruckus hard rock that those four loonies from the Western suburbs of Chicago play that gives me permanent grinnage. Need some perma-grin of your own? Then you better hitch a ride on the Convoy train to one of these upcoming gigs: Sat. May 24 at The Back Bar in Janesville, and Sun. May 25 at Brat Fest in Madison. CONVOY are Brian Corbin: vocals and guitar, Mike Getz: drums, John Daniel: lead guitar, and Dan “Big D” Thompson: bass.


Read More...

1907 ViewsPermalinkConvoy Website

Anvil

An Interview with Lead Singer/Guitar player Steve “Lips” Kudlow
by Teri Barr
May 2014

They’re referred to as one of the pioneers of heavy metal, yet many people only discovered the hard-driving music of Anvil through the documentary, “The Story of Anvil”, a few years ago. The Canadian-based band hit the scene in the late-1970’s with names like Dokken and Whitesnake, yet almost as quickly disappeared. Grit, determination, and their pure love of metal music kept them on the road and in the studio throughout the 80’s and 90’s. But the documentary created the cult-like following of fans, old and new, and the band released its 15th album to rave reviews last year.

Now Anvil, made up of lead singer and guitar player Steve “Lips” Kudlow, drummer Robb Reiner, and new bass player Sal Italiano, are on the road in support of their new music, including May shows in Milwaukee, St. Paul, and Chicago. Just before they hit the Midwest, Steve “Lips” Kudlow talked to me by phone, answering questions about the music business, the band’s “never say die” attitude, and why he still thinks the most important thing he can do is connect with fans, one-on-one.

Maximum Ink: You’re in the midst of a pretty aggressive tour; first across Europe, now the U.S. How’s it going?
Steve “Lips” Kudlow with Anvil: Well, this is our biggest tour of the U.S., ever! And it’s taking a lot of strength. I mean, we aren’t 20 years old anymore (laughs), but luckily for us there aren’t any vices, plus we’re all healthy. Still, even after 37 years of Anvil, we are a new band to some who come out to see us. So we consider this an incredible achievement. And there’s something to be said for still living the dream!

MI: So, you don’t have your regular job anymore? I recall seeing you in “The Story of Anvil” documentary trying a few different things, including delivering food for a school to support your family. 
Lips: Nope. We are a full-time band. And we are going to work hard to keep it that way. Anvil has a lot of self-belief and confidence and we feel the hoopla is just building all over again, so we need to keep creating opportunities for the band and our music. Plus, we still think we have something special to share with our fans.


Read More...

1929 ViewsPermalinkAnvil WebsiteAnvil MySpaceAnvil Wiki
Madison's Sigourney Weavers

The Sigourney Weavers

An Interview with the members of The Sigourney Weavers
by Teri Barr
June 2014

The four women who make up the unique band known as The Sigourney Weavers, could just as easily call themselves The Ellen Ripleys (the main character actress Sigourney Weaver plays in the Alien movies). I’ve seen an alien-faced balloon or several appear at their shows, otherwise the mystery to their musical imagination is hidden by the fact, this band rocks!

The Sigourney Weavers came together for what was supposed to be a one-and-done effort, and luckily realized they had some special chemistry. The band’s first album is just out, and more original music is in the works.
And the fun and games inspired by another universe keep you on your toes, as I learned when recently asking Sandy Kowal (drums, vocals), Ellie Erickson (lead guitar, vocals), Pam Barrett (lead vocals, guitar), and Julie Kiland (bass guitar, vocals) to share their secrets from within The Sigourney Weavers with Maximum Ink. 

Maximum Ink: How did each of you get started in music, and what brought the four of you together as a group?
Sandy Kowal:
I started drumming when I was 16. My high school boyfriend and I started a band and needed a drummer. I was elected. Pam and Ellie formed The Sigourney Weavers and had been playing together for a little while, but needed a drummer and bass player for a Girls Rock Camp fundraiser. They found me through a friend, I found Julie through another friend. We meshed well and decided to keep the band going after the fundraiser.
Ellie Erickson: I played my first gig when I turned 30 after I found, if I didn’t force myself to learn to play by ear, I’d have to stop listening to music—because if I wasn’t going to play some instrument, I’d need to go deaf. And I prefer to do that with rock and roll rather than an ice pick. Now as a band, we’re all musical freaks with a lot of different bands in the dust bin of our history, and an industrial size dumpster left to fill up if we don’t all get hit by a meteorite or upload to the alien singularity I hope we get before the bozos drive our civilization’s bus into the junkyard of history.
Pam Barrett: What am I supposed to say now, Ellie!? O.K., it wasn’t until I volunteered to play a Girls Rock Camp fundraiser and started freaking out after realizing, if I didn’t pull something together, I’d have to play it solo. So, Ellie agreed to play with me, then after a few practices said we need a drummer, and found Sandy. Then Sandy said, we need a bass player and found Julie. And we started to play together and realized, we sound damn good! And this is fun!
Julie Kiland: My background is much more serious. I started in high school with the band and chorus, then played in cover bands until I was found by The Sigourney Weavers.

MI:  What’s your goal with the band?
SK:
I enjoy playing music and writing songs. So far it’s been fun with The SW’s. When it stops being fun is when I’ll stop. For me, it’s a good way to express myself.
EE: Mine is to keep jumping around and tripping over stuff on stage, while playing that boat anchor guitar, while also having a few thousand metric shit-tons of fun until I fall over dead. Or the band fires me because my idiot streak is getting bigger than my savant streak.
PB: Playing in a band is where it’s at for me. I’ve never wanted to play solo. There’s something special about playing with other musicians and creating something unique. It’s pleasing. It’s calming. And it’s a bonus that other people actually enjoy listening! My goal is to keep playing out and as long as people want to listen, we’ll keep creating a different performance every time we play.
JK: I just want to get out there, have fun, and play music with my talented and sometimes freaky band-mates. Oh, and I’d like to receive a cease and desist letter from Sigourney Weaver.


Read More...

Madison's Sunspot

Sunspot

An Interview with the members of Sunspot
by Teri Barr
June 2014

It’s a large arena sound, from a small band with supersonic energy. A Sunspot show is tight, fast, and really fun; and while you can hear the difference in their many years of playing together as a group; you can also see it on stage.
Mike Huberty (lead singer, bass, keyboard) and Ben Jaeger (lead guitar, keyboard, singer) have gelled since junior high. Wendy Lynn Staats (drums, singer, violin) joined them in college, and the three have never looked back.

The past 14 years, in a brief discography list with much-deserved awards, look like this: Radio Free Earth (2000), Loser of the Year (2002, Madison Area Music Association Award-MAMAs Rock Album of the Year), Cynical (2005, WAMI Artist of the Year), Neanderthal (2007), Singularity (2009, MAMAs Rock Album of the Year, Video of the Year, Rock Song of the Year), Major Arcana (live rock opera national tour and DVD), The Slingshot Effect (2011, MAMAs Rock Album of the Year and Song of the Year), Arthuriana-EP (2013), Archaeopteryx-EP (2014), and now the Dangerous Times-EP, being released at a special show at The Dragonfly in July. Huberty is describing it this way by saying, “We go all out in our live show and we want people who’ve seen us dozens of times to get something new out of each experience. The Dragonfly show is going to be one of the most complex set pieces we’ve attempted. The songs link together, so it’s more of a musical than just a collection of songs performed live. We do our best to make sure that every aspect of every show has meaning. We won’t be pulling any punches for this party. We’re saying that “the fireworks are starting early for the 4th this year” and we mean it.”

And I know they do. I’ve interviewed the band before, I’ve seen their shows in all types of venues, and I’ve followed them through their many treks with technology, and to SXSW. The enthusiasm for what they do as a band, is contagious.
Read on for more from all the notes I’ve compiled and edited via past and present interviews and chats. You’ll understand how Sunspot could soon launch into the Stratosphere.


Read More...

1230 ViewsPermalinkSunspot Website
Page 5 of 12 pages ‹ First  < 3 4 5 6 7 >  Last ›

Search Maximum Ink's Archives

Partners: Rökker Vodka